How to look slimmer (without the inconvenience of exercise or dieting)

Hello friends. We all work hard and it’s only fair that we reward ourselves by indulging in the finer things in life. Unfortunately, hard work means we often don’t find enough time for exercise, and along with good food and wine, that has an impact on the waistline. Luckily, clever tailoring can help you maintain a relatively slim appearance, even if you have put on a bit of weight.
 
Of course, there’s a limit to what a tailor can achieve. We’re not plastic surgeons. We are more like magicians, directing the viewer’s focus and creating the illusion of a more svelte physique.
 
A highly effective tool is pinstripe-patterned cloth (like the Vitale Barberis Canonico pictured below), which will help give a sense of length and draw the eye along a vertical line. Pinstripe or plain, the stout should always wear darker colours. A big man in a white jacket? Forget it. It’s going to magnify him by 30 percent. The larger guy should avoid shiny cloth (go for a matte fabric, it’s more stylish anyway), and if he’s considering a check, make it a small, all-over pattern, like a fine glen plaid.

 A grey pinstripe cloth (like this one, from VBC) will help visually slim you down.

A grey pinstripe cloth (like this one, from VBC) will help visually slim you down.

As for suit styling, be careful with patch pockets, they can broaden the hips. Inset pockets could be savvier. Contrary to common belief, double-breasted suits can actually be very flattering on the larger man. The person looking at you will focus on the buttons, rather than the silhouette of the jacket. It’s a visual effect, a diversion.
 
Don’t wear your clothing tight — that will just accentuate any bulges. Baggy trousers are a no-no, but a slightly roomier pleated pant (fastening at the natural waist) will be much more flattering than a flat front, where often the belly protrudes over the top. Not pretty.
 
Speaking of bulging bellies, I’m in Japan right now, appreciating the work of the country’s many artisanal craftspeople — and amazing chefs. After a few days of Japanese culinary indulgence, it might be high time to make myself a new charcoal pinstripe suit when I get back!
 
Until next week,
—Kevin
 
PS: Landing in Tokyo today, we were so honoured to see Kevin Seah Bespoke featured in The Rake Japan’s write-up on the Singapore sartorial scene. Order a copy of the new issue and take a look. Arigatou gozaimasu!